The volume, the first of its kind to explore the ‘dark side’ of digital diplomacy, sets out to examine how governments make sense, manage and respond to two forms of digital propaganda that have proved particularly corrosive for Western countries in the recent years: state-sponsored disinformation and violent extremism.

This second edition has been revised and updated, with new material on such key contemporary issues as Syria, Ukraine, migration and the South China Sea. The text summarizes and discusses the major trends in the field of diplomacy, providing an innovative theoretical approach to understanding diplomacy not as a collection of practices or a set of historical traditions, but as a form of institutionalized communication through which authorized representatives produce, manage and distribute public goods.

 

This volume investigates secret diplomacy with the aim of understanding its role in shaping foreign policy.To this end, the volume is structured around three distinct themes: concepts, contexts and cases. The first section elaborates on the different meanings and manifestations of the concept; the second part examines basic contexts that underpin the practice of secret diplomacy; while the third section presents a series of empirical cases of particular relevance for contemporary diplomatic practice.

This volume, the first of its kind, brings together established scholars and experienced policy-makers to examine how digital diplomacy works. Organised around a common theme of investigating digital diplomacy as a form of change management, the book theorizes what digital diplomacy is, assesses its relationship to traditional forms of diplomacy, examines the latent power dynamics inherent in digital diplomacy, and assesses the conditions under which digital diplomacy informs, regulates, or constrains foreign policy.

The volume summarises and discusses the major trends in the field of diplomacy, developing an innovative analytical toolbox for understanding diplomacy not as a collection of practices or a set of historical traditions, but as a form of institutionalised communication through which authorised representatives produce, manage and distribute public goods.

This book deals with the question of how global governance can and ought to effectively address global challenges, such as financial instability, military conflict, distributive injustice and environmental degradation. Providing a unified theoretical framework, the contributors to the volume synthesise John Searle's institutional philosophy with argumentation theory into a novel deontology to explain how the structure of global governance arrangements are in part constituted by processes of argumentation between actors.

This book examines the conditions under which the decision to use force can be reckoned as legitimate in international relations. The theoretical originality and empirical value of the concept of "deliberative legitimacy" comes into force with the examination of two post Cold War international crises: the 1999 NATO intervention in Kosovo and the 2003 US military action against Iraq.

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Diplomacy as World Disclosure, Bjola
Diplomatic Leadership, Bjola
Legitimacy, use of force and communicative action, Bjola
Diplomacy as World Disclosure, Bjola
Negotiation Breakthrough Analysis, Climate Change, Bjola
Security Communities and the habitus of restraint, Bjola & Kornprobst
Ethics of Secret Diplomacy, Bjola
Diplomacy as World Disclosure, Bjola
Momentum analysis, Climate negotiations, Bjola
Enmity and Friendship, Diplomacy, Bjola
Arctic governance, plurilateral diplomacy, Bjola
Analytical normative divide, Bjola
Diplomacy as World Disclosure, Bjola
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Diplomatic Leadership, Bjola
Diplomacy as World Disclosure, Bjola
Diplomacy as World Disclosure, Bjola
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